Photo
Text

We gravitate around human beings and subjects whose matter grows with ours.

We cannot grow with matters that merely survive. Or those which release toxins more than they release antidotes.

Living means transforming with changing environments. Even when it seems life cannot exist there.

Photoset

(Source: nevebianca, via smart-assy)

Photoset

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Found Faces

1. © Theodore G. Jay Joslin III. Sinking Feeling II

2. © Angel Martinez Martinez. Sometimes I See … Faces!

3. © Richard Harrison. Cardbored? This photo was taken on a hot afternoon in my parents garden. After taking hundreds of photos of our children playing, my eye started to wander, and I found this sad little cardboard man discarded from the packaging of a playhouse.

4. © Danielle Cosme. A Seedy Smile

5.© Drew Makepeace. Wall Face. I don’t actively look for faces; they pop out at me when I least expect it. Its like the faces are finding me rather than the other way around.

6. © Georgescu Catalin Cristian. Rasta Mana. This face is made out of the wires and cables that dangle from the side of my desk. They caught my eye while I was resting in bed with my head tilted sideways. I stared at the screws and began to see the face of a rasta man with braided hair. And no, I did not set this shot up.

7. © Sven Vahar. Smiles Make Hearts Grow

8.© Tim Simpson. How Do You Like Your Eggs? This image is composed of my breakfast. I was having a new kitchen installed and couldn’t boil my weekend eggs, so I bought a microwave egg cooker. One Saturday morning, this face appeared, looking at me, slightly shocked about what was going to happen.

Found Faces is one of those light-hearted photobooks that compiles photos taken by fun-loving photographers from all over the world. It’s a celebration of the artist in all of us — and it’s sure to make you smile. The focus of this book is the art of finding “faces” in unexpected places — and the combined result is a riot of quirky points of view.

It includes the work of over 90 photographers from 26 different countries, along with their often-humorous reflections on their particular discoveries.

This would be an ideal book to share with a beginning photographer — dozens of examples demonstrating simple ways to “see” differently in the world that’s all around us.  

Quote
"Respect yourself enough to walk away from anything that no longer grows you."

TheDailyPositive.com (via thedailypozitive)

Photoset

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg

Guardians

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum

2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum

3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery

4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum

5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery

6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum

7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum

8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum

9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery

10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery

Quote
"That’s how you can tell that you’re filling yourself with the wrong things. You use a lot of energy, and in the end, you feel emptier and less comfortable than ever."

— Glennon Doyle Melton, Carry On, Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed  (via audrotas)

(Source: recycledsoul, via vintage-kisses)

Photoset

showslow:

Elegant Multilayered Paper Silhouettes (via)

London-based photographer Dan Tobin Smith, in collaboration with set designer and art director Rachel Thomas, captures the silhouetted profile of a woman in multicolored layers. The creatively dreamy works in this series titled Paper Profiles appear both illustrative and sculptural. While some may speculate that the image is digitally rendered, it is in fact made entirely by hand, as it is the creative duo’s signature style to fully construct the scene and simply photograph it.

Dan Tobin Smith website
Rachel Thomas website

Photo
bluepueblo:

Canal Reflection, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
photo via leila

bluepueblo:

Canal Reflection, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

photo via leila

Photoset